The Geneva Bible 1587 Edition
one of the most historically significant translations of the Bible into the English language,
preceding the King James translation by 51 years.

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E. C. Marsh
P.O. Box 342
Saint Ansgar, IA 50472

GENEVA BIBLE

Habakkuk

[1] [2] [3]

Chapter 1

1 The burden which Habakkuk the prophet saw. The Argument - The Prophet complains to God, considering the great felicity of the wicked, and the miserable oppression of the godly, who endure all types of affliction and cruelty, and yet can see no end. Therefore he had this revelation shown to him by God, that the Chaldeans would come and take them away as captives, so that they could look for no end of their troubles as yet, because of their stubbornness and rebellion against the Lord. And lest the godly should despair, seeing this horrible confusion, he comforts them by this, that God will punish the Chaldeans their enemies, when their pride and cruelty will be at height. And for this reason he exhorts the faithful to patience by his own example, and shows them a form of prayer, with which they should comfort themselves.

2 O LORD, how long shall I cry, and thou wilt not hear! [even] cry out to thee The Prophet complains to God, and bewails that among the Jews is left no fairness and brotherly love: but instead of these reigns cruelty, theft, contention, and strife. [of] violence, and thou wilt not save!

3 Why doest thou shewe mee iniquitie, and cause me to beholde sorowe? for spoyling, and violence are before me: and there are that rayse vp strife and contention.

4 Therefore the law is feeble, and judgment doth never go forth: for the wicked doth To suppress him, if any should show himself zealous of God's cause. surround the righteous; therefore judgment goeth forth Because the judges who should remedy this excess, are as evil as the rest. perverted

5 Behold ye among the nations, and regard, and wonder marvellously: for [I] will work a work in your days, [which] As in times past you would not believe God's word, so you will not now believe the strange plagues which are at hand. ye will not believe, though it be told [you].

6 For lo, I raise vp the Caldeans, that bitter & furious nation, which shall goe vpon the breadth of the lande to possesse the dwelling places, that are not theirs.

7 They [are] terrible and dreadful: They themselves will be your judges in this cause, and none will have authority over them to control them. their judgment and their dignity shall proceed from themselves.

8 Their horses also are swifter then the leopards, and are more fierce then the wolues in the euening: and their horsemen are many: & their horsemen shall come from farre: they shall flie as the eagle hasting to meate.

9 They shall come all for violence: their faces shall sup up [as] the For the Jews most feared this wind, because it destroyed their fruits. east wind, and they shall gather the captives They will be so many in number. as the sand.

10 And they shall scoff at the kings, and the princes shall be a scorn to them: they shall deride every strong hold; for they shall heap They will cast up mounds against it. dust, and take it.

11 Then shall [his] mind change, and he shall The Prophet comforts the faithful that God will also destroy the Babylonians, because they will abuse this victory, and become proud and insolent, attributing the praise of this to their idols. pass over, and offend, [imputing] this his power to his god.

12 [Art] thou not from everlasting, O LORD my God, my Holy One? we shall not He assures the godly of God's protection, showing that the enemy can do no more than God has appointed, and also that their sins require such a sharp rod. die. O LORD, thou hast ordained them for judgment; and, O mighty God, thou hast established them for correction.

13 Thou art of pure eyes, and canst not see euill: thou canst not behold wickednesse: wherefore doest thou looke vpon the transgressors, and holdest thy tongue when the wicked deuoureth the man, that is more righteous then he?

14 And makest men as the So that the great devours the small, and the Chaldeans destroy all the world. fishes of the sea, as the creeping animals, [that have] no ruler over them?

15 They take vp all with the angle: they catch it in their net, and gather it in their yarne, whereof they reioyce and are glad.

16 Therefore they sacrifice to their Meaning that the enemies flatter themselves, and glory in their own strength, power, and intellect. net, and burn incense to their drag; because by them their portion [is] fat, and their food plenteous.

17 Shall they therefore empty their net, and not spare continually to slay Meaning, that they would not. the nations?

Presented by The Common Man's Prospective. Copyright© 1999-2012 Ernest C. Marsh